Monthly Archives: April 2014

Prepping a House For Sale

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If you are getting ready to put your house on the market, consider a few of these tips to help maximize appeal and improve how well your house shows to prospective buyers.

1)   Enhance curb appeal.

When a house goes on the market, generally the owners have expended some thought and energy towards making the interior of the home look immaculate.  But, you only get one opportunity to make a positive first impression, so do not let the exterior of your home go untouched:

  • Power wash the house!  A quick power wash takes years of dirt off of the house, making a huge immediate difference.  Get the siding back to a vibrant state and have the windows sparkle.
  • Make sure your house number is clean and easy to read.  Visitors dislike not being able to identify the house quickly as it makes the house not feel welcoming.
  • Consider a handful of new landscaping to impress upon visitors.  Fresh greenery really enhances the appeal of the home and gives the impression that the home is well attended to.  And don’t forget to prune back overgrowth.
  • Create a welcoming front door and porch area.  This can be a simply a new door mat, a coat of vibrant paint on the front door, or a casual patio set that creates an inviting seating area.

Many of these exterior improvements can set the tone for the rest of the showing, impressing upon buyers the feeling of a cared-for home, one of steady maintenance and quality upkeep.

2)   Make obvious repairs.

Now is a good time to attend to the small repairs that have accumulated over the years of living comfortably.  Broken window pane, cracked deck tiles, non-functioning light fixtures – addressing the visually-obvious issues beforehand helps touring buyers stay focused on the big picture of whether the house is a good fit for their needs.  Removing these detracting items paves the way for a smooth and favorable showing.

3)   De-clutter and depersonalize.

Buyers want to envision their belongings in the home they are touring. Help them see that vision by removing personal effects such as framed photos, tchotchkes, extra items of furniture, and toys.  The idea is to have the house look generic and spacious.  The old adage “less is more” is sage advice to heed.  Hire a cleaning crew to deep clean the house and have every surface return to near-original glory.  Keep in mind that people during showings may check out the closets and cluttered closets imply lack of storage, so definitely make a pass at organizing and filtering through your closet spaces.

4)   Neutralize.

The teal accent wall highlighting the dining room might be too bold for some buyers.  If you are going to make some light redecorating changes, consider going neutral in the choices you make.  A neutral palette is generally received as welcoming and will appeal to the majority of the people walking through the house.  Complementing color can be added through linens and bedding and décor items.

Once the house has been prepped, then the discussion can progress to furniture staging.  Stay tuned next week and we will provide some staging advice.

Boosting Your Credit

 

Credit report on a digital tablet

Several blog posts ago, we covered what you ought to do in anticipation of an imminent home purchase.  One of the “must do’s” was to check your credit as your credit score is a critical factor a lender considers in their underwriting process that goes into determining the details of your loan package.

For that reason, it’s incredibly relevant for you to check your credit report and score with the three credit bureaus: Experian, TransUnion and Equifax. Each bureau will yield different credit scores so it’s pertinent to cover all three.  Upon receipt of your reports and scores, carefully review them and see if there are ways to improve your credit profile as often times the reports will include incorrect information and errors.

Boost Your Credit Score

Here are a couple of actionable steps to take that can boost your score over time:

1)   Pay your bills on time and in full when possible.

2)   Don’t open new lines of credit.

3)   Try to reduce your credit card debt to 25% or less of your credit line on each card.

4)   Don’t close your credit card accounts because then you’ll be using more of your overall credit limit.

5)   If you have an old credit card that you haven’t used in awhile, use it and then pay the bill in full to show that you can responsibly handle credit.

6)   Bring your over-the-limit and past-due accounts up-to-date.

7)   If you have any collections or judgments against you, pay them off as quickly as possible.

A reputable lender can suggest specific actions on how to deal with errors in reporting so it’s smart to develop a relationship with a lender early in the home buying process.  Additionally, lenders can tell you what minimum credit score is required for a particular loan program.

While lenders look at many factors when evaluating you for a mortgage loan, including your debt-to-income ratio, your income and assets, how much your down payment will be and your job history, your credit score is a vital determinant toward a favorable loan package.  Therefore improving your credit profile is clearly in your best interest during the months before beginning a serious home search.

The Pre-Buying Don’ts

Credit history form on a digital tablet

 

In our last blog installment, we discussed some pre-buying do’s.  Equally important to your home buying preparatory work are several pre-buying don’ts:

1)   Don’t Go Credit-Crazy

As previously mentioned in the “do’s” post, it’s smart to monitor your credit in the months leading up to a home purchase.  With every new line of credit opening, your credit score gets dinged.  So if a creditor solicits you for another amazing credit card with major perks, don’t bite during this crucial time.  Avoid any financial transactions that require inquiry into your credit health.

2)   Don’t Get Behind on Bills

Having a late payment hit your credit report before closing can impact your ability to get the loan you need.  Payment history comprise about a third of your credit health.  Many banks require 12 consecutive months of on-time payments to qualify for a loan in the first place.  A 30-day late blemish could cause lenders to rethink your loan application all together.

3)   Don’t Switch Jobs

Any change in employment is a significant risk from a lender’s perspective.  Lenders desire clients with stable, reliable income and generally will ask you to provide a picture of income stability during the underwriting process, as stability equates to the less likelihood of default in the their eyes.  During this crucial time of financial scrutiny, don’t switch jobs, don’t go entrepreneurial and become self-employed, and certainly don’t quit your job.

4)   Don’t Buy Anything Major

Don’t buy a car or truck or any other form of transportation that you have to finance.  Buying one increases your debt-to-income ratio and that’s something loan officers don’t want to see.  Additionally, don’t buy furniture or major appliances before buying your new house.  Like financing a car, charging big-ticket items negatively impacts your financial standing.  Keep yourself in good graces with your lending institution by minimizing your large expenditures.

The process of purchasing a home can be long and complicated.  From the moment you decide to become a homeowner until you close on your dream house, you want to provide a clean bill of credit so that your home gets financed favorably. Even if you have good credit at the beginning of the journey, there are ways to blemish your qualifications and make lenders think twice.  Being fiscally absentminded or slightly irresponsible with your credit health could cost you down the line.